Naan Bread 

I lovelovelove Indian food with all of my food obsessed heart. I cook curry probably once a week at home because it is delicious, wholesome, nutritious and budget-friendly. I don’t love rice though, which is why I sway towards bread as my carb of choice when eating curry. 

Naan bread is a soft and fluffy leavened flat bread (made with yeast) which is eaten all over south and Central Asia. They are thought to have been influenced by middle eastern flatbreads such as Pitta, as the Persian word nān being a generic word for bread seems to suggest. What makes Indian naan bread different from other Indian breads is that they are cooked in a tandoor oven, which is a traditional wood or coal fired oven made of clay. These ovens are heated to extreme temperatures and the dough is slapped to the side of the oven to cook. 

Obviously I don’t have a tandoori oven at home (I wish I did!), so I turn to my trusty cast iron skillet to make my naan. The beauty of this being that in the winter I can bake my naan in the kitchen and when the weather is on my side, I take my skillet outdoors and use it over my fire pit. This makes sure the naan absorb all the delicious smoky flavours from the fire and gives it a more authentic flavour. If you don’t own a cast iron pan, use the heaviest frying pan or skillet that you own, just don’t put it on an open fire! 

Naan Bread

Ingredients:

  • 500g strong white flour
  • 20g sugar
  • 10g salt
  • 14g dried yeast (2 sachets)
  • 150g coconut cream
  • 200g water
  • 1 tsp nigella seeds


Method

  1. Place your flour, sugar and salt in a bowl and mix together with your hand. Make a well in the centre.
  2. Dissolve the yeast in to the water and pour in to the well. Use your hands to begin mixing the flour and water together. Then add the coconut cream and nigella seeds and mix in the bowl until it starts to form a sticky dough.
  3. Turn the mixture out on to a floured work surface and knead for about ten minutes, until you have a soft dough.
  4. Place the dough in a clean, oiled bowl and cover with a clean towel. Leave to rise for 2 hours in a warm place.
  5. Once the dough has risen, turn out on to your work surface and divide in to 8 equal portions.  Roll each portion in to a ball, place on a floured tray and cover. Leave to rest for 20 minutes to allow the gluten to relax. This will make it easier to shape the dough.
  6. When the dough has rested, start heating your pan. It needs to be really hot, so set the burner to its highest flame.
  7. Roll out your first ball of dough in to a flat, tear drop or oval shape, approximately 1cm thick. I find it easier to roll the dough flat with a rolling pin and then use my hands to shape it in to an oval by gently pulling the dough.
  8. Then place your shaped dough on to the hot pan. You will notice immediately that bubbles start to form under the surface of the dough. 
  9. After a minute, flip the dough over and cook the other side. Don’t worry it the dough catches a little where it has formed bubble, this darkness adds flavour to the bread.
  10. Whilst the first flatbread is cooking, you can shape the next one so that it is ready to go.
  11. When the bread is cooked, wrap in a clean towel and cook the next one. 
  12. Serve immediately with your favourite curry.


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